I wear clunky jewelry so I don’t bleed to death.

Less than 100 days until the NYC Marathon! It’s coming up quickly.

The last week of training was a bit of a mess—I ended up having some of the worst food poisoning of my life and my training was somewhat derailed.

But the important thing is that I still managed to get in my long run on Friday morning. From everyone I’ve talked to, this is the weekly run that is absolutely essential to a successful race day. Life and work can sometimes mess up your plans to regularly run during the week, but the long run must happen no matter what. No excuses.

With plans over the next few weekends, I’m trying to adjust my schedule to do my long run on Fridays before work. It’s definitely rough while I’m doing it, but it makes the entire weekend that much better once it’s out of the way!


Although running is keeping me healthy and improving my leg, I’m also constantly running about in my life. My days are filled with work, friends, travel, etc. that always keep me on the go–but despite being busy, I am a strong proponent of taking precautions and being safe where you can.

Because my deep vein thrombosis (DVT or blood clots) was so severe, I’ve been on a whole slew of medications to thin my blood. I’m currently taking xarelto (aka rivaroxaban—I’m a huge fan, and happy to discuss with anyone in more detail) and a baby aspirin daily. The xarelto is an anticoagulant (helps to lengthen the time it takes for my blood to clot) and the aspirin is an antiplatelet (helps to prevent my blood cells from clumping together to form a blood clot).

In short, because the veins in my leg are so damaged, I am highly susceptible to developing another DVT. And as with all DVT, if a part of the clot breaks off and goes to my heart and lungs, I will develop a pulmonary embolism (PE). PEs can be instantly fatal because they can cut off blood flow into the lungs. I had several PEs when I was first diagnosed, but was lucky they were small and not fatal.

Clearly this is not an acceptable risk. I therefore take blood thinners daily, and may well be on them for the rest of my life.

But what are the risks?

While the blood thinners help prevent future blood clots and help save my life, they also prevent my blood from clotting when I’m injured.

What does this mean?

It definitely doesn’t help that I’m a klutz, but I’ve stepped on glass and bled everywhere for close to an hour. I’ve walked into a door and given myself a concussion. I’ve bumped into tables and everyday objects and ended up with massive bruises. I’ve had bloody noses in dry weather that last a completely unreasonable amount of time.

And for the most part, this isn’t a big deal. But it does mean I’m banned from a lot of physical activities. I’m not allowed to play contact sports. I’m never allowed to ski or snowboard. I’m still trying to figure out if I can SCUBA. And I’d be an idiot for playing paintball. Lucky for me, I’ve never been coordinated enough to do most sports—it’s another reason why running is so important to me. Running is no-contact and requires nothing more than putting one foot in front of the other.

The greatest risk of being on blood thinners is mass trauma. What happens if I get hit by a car? Or something falls out of a window? Or I fall off a balcony? It’s in the freak accidents that there is the most danger. All of these are accidents that would endanger anyone, but in my case I will not stop bleeding.

Unfortunately there is currently no known antidote for xarelto (some blood thinners, such as warfarin/coumadin have a known antidote, but require much more daily upkeep and effort). This may change soon, but for now the risk of uncontrollable bleeding is even more serious. It is therefore very important that should I get in an accident, the EMT or other healthcare professional immediately know my medications and condition.

Amaris White DVT PE FACTOR V ON XARELTO ASA (aspirin) DAD 925-XXX-XXXX

Amaris White
DVT PE FACTOR V
ON XARELTO ASA (aspirin)
DAD 925-XXX-XXXX

That’s why I wear a medical bracelet—it lists my name, conditions, medications and emergency contact. I wear it all the time and never take it off—going out, showering, exercising, etc. Odds are it will never be used, but there’s a peace of mind knowing that I’m prepared for the worst case scenario.

You can buy the same bracelet here.

I previously wore this medical bracelet, but was worried it wouldn't catch a medical professional's eye in an emergency.

I previously wore this medical bracelet, but was worried it wouldn’t catch a medical professional’s eye in an emergency.

I had previously worn a nicer looking bracelet, but it looked too similar to the LIVESTRONG bracelets that so many people wear variations of today, and a former EMT friend of mine let me know that he would not recognize it to be a medical alert bracelet.

I got both my bracelets at Walgreens.com.

And so I’m sticking to the clunky big metal bracelet with the giant red medical alert notice. It’s not pretty, but in an emergency situation where every second counts, you want it to be easily recognizable.

Hopefully (probably) I will never need it. For those of you who are also on blood thinners, I highly recommend you wear one as well. We’ve already cheated death once, and there’s no reason for us to do it again—better safe than sorry!

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