STOP THE CLOT.

I’m training for the NYC Marathon.

I am both excited and terrified. It will in many ways be the hardest thing I have ever done.

  1. Running 26.2 miles is really hard.
  2. Running 26.2 miles after having a severe DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and pulmonary embolisms (PEs) in both lungs is really, really hard.

But I’m determined to do it.

Although doctors initially told me I would never be able to run again, I have since run five half marathons and numerous other races. I run regularly, and I’m convinced running saves my life daily.

DVT left the veins in my left leg a scarred and clotted mess. But running has allowed my body to heal and generate new veins (collateral veins) to help meet the demands I put on it with an active lifestyle.

I am still slower than I was two years ago, but I am determined to be better than I was before.

This is where the marathon comes in.

A marathon was something I thought impossible two years ago when I was healthy. A marathon was impossible a year and a half ago when I was in the hospital. A marathon was still impossible when I signed up. A marathon is still impossible today. But by training for and running the NYC Marathon, I want to prove to myself (and hopefully to you) that anything is possible.


I also want to use my first marathon as an opportunity to spread awareness. By sharing my story, I have already been able to warn my friends and family about the signs, symptoms and dangers of a blood clot, but I want to take this further, and I’m hoping you’ll help.

More than one person dies every six minutes from a pulmonary embolism.

That’s 274 people dying each day from a blood clot.

This is more than HIV, breast cancer and motor vehicle crashes COMBINED.

These numbers are completely crazy and should not be this high. How could these numbers be reduced? Awareness. Awareness. Awareness. If more people knew how to (1) recognize the signs and symptoms of a DVT before it was too late, and (2) take simple precautions to avoid a DVT, thousands of lives could be saved each year.


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The National Blood Clot Alliance is one of the largest organizations working to help spread awareness of DVT and provide assistance to those who have experienced a DVT. Although its focus has in the past been on patient advocacy, it is refocusing its efforts on public awareness in 2015 and in the future.

TEAM STOP THE CLOT for the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon is raising money for the National Blood Clot Alliance to help support this goal. Each team member is running 26.2 miles to help raise funds and spread the word to STOP THE CLOT.

My hope is that one day DVT and PE will be as well-known as breast cancer, skin cancer, or AIDS. It is through the efforts of many hard-working volunteers as well as generous funding that these have become everyday words.

It would mean a great deal to me if you could help achieve this goal.

Because I am not running the NYC Marathon on a charity bib (I qualified by running 9 races + 1 volunteering job last year), any money I raise will be used exclusively to STOP THE CLOT. All funds will create awareness for the general public and hopefully prevent more stories like mine from occurring.

I also promise that if you donate to my campaign, I will RUN WITH YOUR NAME on my shirt during the race–this way, we will be running together. 🙂 No donation is too small, and any amount will help STOP THE CLOT.

PLEASE DONATE HERE.

Thank you!

Let’s take this TO INFINITY AND BEYOND!

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